Actively Aging

Actively Aging

Tuesday, September 19, 2017

The Great Story of ... Oh Wait ... I Forgot What It Was

By Dave Price
This article 1st appeared in Booming Encore

As a new member of the Over 65 Club, I think everyone younger than me (and that’s a whole lot of people) should come up with a plan to remember things. In fact, I strongly suggest you design that plan as soon as you finish reading this article.
That way, you won’t forget.
Now I know what many of you are saying: I don’t need a plan … my memory will always stay sharp and focused. Well, I felt that way once, too. But I was so much younger then – say like 63 or 64.
Now however, like the Ancient Mariner of the famous Samuel Taylor Coleridge poem or the lone surviving whaler called Ishmael in the classic novel Moby Dick, I have returned to offer you a warning.

Monday, September 18, 2017

Passing On Your Family History to Your Grandkids

By Dave Price
This article 1st appeared in Sixty and Me

Of all the gifts that grandparents can give their grandchildren, few are grander than a sense of where they fit in to the history of their family.
Why do I say that?
Well, who is better positioned than grandparents to be the family griots, a term for those great African storytellers, whose job it is to be a repository of tribal history, traditions, and culture and pass them on to future generations?
To keep reading this article, click here.

Saturday, September 16, 2017

Dancing The Night Away Can Reverse Signs of Aging


Physical exercise has an anti-aging effect on the hippocampus region of the brain -- an area that controls memory, learning and balance. 

A new study, comparing different forms of exercise -- dancing and endurance training -- undertaken by elderly volunteers for eighteen months, shows that both can have an anti-aging effect on the brain, but only dancing corresponded to a noticeable difference in behavior. 

This difference is attributed to the extra challenge of learning dancing routines.

To keep reading this article, click here.

Thursday, September 7, 2017

Should You Record Your Doctor's Visit?



Remembering everything a doctor tells you can be difficult under any circumstances. Add on such complications as pain, anxiety, hearing loss or cognitive issues and patients are at risk of forgetting or misremembering important medical information. 
To counter these issues, some patients are documenting their medical visits with a digital audio recorder or their smartphone, reports the New York Times. While many doctors may object to the practice out of concern that confidential discussions could be shared online or used in malpractice lawsuits, others support the trend. These doctors include James Ryan, a family practitioner in Ludington, Mich., whose office provides recordings for his patients.
To keep reading this article, click here.

Wednesday, September 6, 2017

How to Separate The Treasures from the Trash


You may have just missed National Garage Sale Day — always the second Saturday in August — but there are still plenty of end-of-the-summer sales to peruse.
After all, warm weather always means an onslaught of yard sales, and with the fall months expected to be hotter than usual in many parts of the country, you can bet there will be plenty of opportunities for serious shoppers to pounce.
But as you sort through someone else’s keepsakes, spread out across one collapsible table after another, it can be difficult to discern the treasures from the trash.
To keep reading this article, click here.

Tuesday, September 5, 2017

Looking on the Bright Side of Life Helps You Live Better, Longer

It's a well-known fact that being optimistic and focusing on emotional wellness seems to reduce stress. But did you know that a glass-half-full kind of attitude can offer even more tangible health benefits? Research has found, for instance, that an upbeat attitude, or happiness, can help lessen the burden of chronic pain, say from arthritis, or even reduce your chances of developing cardiovascular disease.

In fact, some experts now think that staying positive can help you live longer. In an intriguing study done at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, researchers followed a group of people for 30 years. They found that those who were originally classified as "optimistic" on a standard personality test turned out to be 20 percent less likely to suffer an early death than those classified as "pessimistic."

To keep reading this article, click here.

Thursday, August 31, 2017

More Older Women Than Ever in the Work Force


Countering earlier trends of older women not participating in the workforce, the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) now projects that by 2024, women over 65 will make up roughly the same percentage of the female workforce as older men do of the male workforce. 

Additionally, BLS predicts that twice as many women over 55 will be in the labor force as women ages 16-24, Quartz reports.

To keep reading this article, click here.

Wednesday, August 30, 2017

What Employers Could Be Doing for Menopausal Workers


With a growing number of older women in the workforce, offices need to take measures to make menopausal females feel as comfortable as possible, a new government report has urged.
These measures include providing more access to desk fans and good ventilation, quiet places to rest, nonsynthetic or lighter uniforms, more natural light and cold-water fountains, in addition to special policies allowing for time off when needed.
To keep reading this article, click here.

Tuesday, August 29, 2017

Should You Cut the Cable TV Chord?


With so many options for viewing shows, how do you decide what is best for your home?
If your household is like most, then you watch 17 television channels and pay a cable or satellite company more than $100 a month for hundreds of them.
Tired of the overkill? You may be ready to cut the cable TV cord.
To keep reading this article, click here.

Monday, August 28, 2017

8 Strategies for Scoring Last-Minute Travel Deals


Growing older means greater flexibility in planning getaways. If you're retired, you don't have to work around school schedules or job demands, and can travel more inexpensively by snagging flights with unsold seats and booking hotels when rates are low.

Get ready to pack your bags on the spur of the moment using these strategies:

To keep reading this article, click here

Friday, August 25, 2017

We're Experiencing a Grandparent Boom


The baby boom has become the grandparent boom: There are now more grandparents in the U.S. than ever before — some 70 million, according to the latest census. That's a 24 percent increase since 2001.
In fact, of all adults over 30, more than 1 in 3 were grandparents as of 2014.
To keep reading this article, click here.

Thursday, August 24, 2017

Older Americans Disrupting 'Burden'Stereotype by Actually Driving the Economy


There is a broadly held common wisdom in Washington that is factually wrong. No one will say it like this, but once you remove all the niceties its core economic claim is the following - "we cannot afford all of these old people."
But what if older people in the United States contributed a larger share of total U.S. Gross Domestic Product (GDP) than their share of the population? That is in fact the case, according to the economic consultancy, Oxford Economics. The data show that people over 50 years of age are only 35% of the U.S. population, but contribute 43% of total U.S. GDP.
Now we have additional insight into the Longevity Economy in each of the 50 states, from a new study by Oxford Economics. Each state report illustrates the percentage of people 50+ living in each county, state population growth by age through 2040, the impact of the Longevity Economy on State GDP, jobs, income, and state & local taxes, consumer spending, workforce participation, and their occupations.
To keep reading this article, click here.

Wednesday, August 23, 2017

Want to Live Longer? Turn Off That TV, Get Up, and Get Moving


Reducing the amount of time you spend sitting each day and cutting back on TV watching could add years to your life, according to a new study.

Researchers analyzed data from the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) for 2005-06 and 2009-10 to determine the amount of time that American adults spend watching TV and sitting down each day.

They combined those data with findings from studies that examined the link between the amount of time people spend sitting and deaths from all causes.

And in what they call a causal link, the researchers concluded that if adults limited the amount of time they spent sitting each day to less than three hours, they might increase their life expectancy by an extra two years. Restricting TV viewing to less than two hours per day might extend life by about 1.4 years.

To keep reading this article, click here.

Tuesday, August 22, 2017

AARP Fighting Measure That Keep Nursing Home Residents from Having Their


Often lurking in the fine print of nursing home contracts is a binding arbitration clause that has serious implications for unsuspecting consumers. Now the federal government plans to give facilities free rein to require residents to agree to such clauses, giving up the right to take their grievances to court.
The Trump administration plans to allow mandatory binding arbitration clauses to be a part of any admission contract for every long-term care facility that accepts federal money. Because nursing homes get federal Medicaid or Medicare funding for virtually all of their residents, that’s pretty much all of them.
Consumer groups say mandatory arbitration clauses stack the deck against nursing home residents, preying on them at a time fraught with anxiety when they and their families are grappling with a serious illness or trying to find a long-term care solution. The consumer groups have been fighting against such clauses for years.
To keep reading this article, click here.

Monday, August 21, 2017

You Love Your Grandkids, But Beware of the Risks of Cosigning Loans for Them

As students head back to college this fall, some families are still looking for ways to pay the tuition bill. Recent studies suggest that one option — private student loans — can pose real risks for the parents and grandparents who are often asked cosign for them.
LendEDU, an online company that specializes in student loan refinancing, surveyed parents who cosigned for their children’s private student loans. Of the parents who responded, 56.8 percent said their credit scores have declined, and 65.8 percent said they have had to help their child make at least one payment. Perhaps not surprisingly, 35 percent said they regretted cosigning for the loans.
To keep reading this article, click here.

Friday, August 18, 2017

Hints for Hip Grandmothers


Grandmas used to wear buns and orthopedic shoes. My grandmothers certainly did. Today's grandmothers are different, because our attitude about aging is different. 
Previously we bought into a lot of myths about aging. As a result, most people dreaded getting old. Today we know that it's possible to live active, rewarding lives for many decades. And by making that possibility a reality, we are serving as role models for our grandchildren, showing them that life doesn't end when the hairgets gray.
To keep reading this article click here.

Thursday, August 17, 2017

Does More Education Mean a Longer Life?

It's graduation season, and new research offers yet another reason to congratulate someone who has completed at least nine years of education: They're likely to live longer.

An unusual, comprehensive study involving 1.2 million Swedes shows that students who were exposed to nine years of education rather than eight had a lower mortality rate after age 40. While the finding suggests an association between level of education and longevity, it does not establish a cause-and-effect link.

Those exposed to the additional year of education also had lower mortality from causes known to be related to education. The research, by Anton Lager of the Centre of Health Equity Studies and Jenny Torssander of the Swedish Institute for Social Research, both part of Stockholm University, was published in this week's issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

To keep reading this article, click here.

Wednesday, August 16, 2017

Keeping a Journal Can Help You Live Longer

Keeping a journal or diary is more than just a way to document your experiences and record your thoughts. Recent research shows that journaling is an effective stress relief exercise, and people who write in a diary or other notebook reap both physical and emotional benefits, potentially increasing their longevity.

One recent study published in Psychotherapy Research found that psychotherapy patients who were told to let out their emotions through expressive writing experienced greater reductions in anxiety and depressive symptoms and better progress in psychotherapy when compared to a control group.

Journaling may help you reduce the amount of worrying you do, too. Another study, published in Behavior Modification, showed that expressive writing was associated with significant decreases in generalized anxiety disorder symptoms, including worry and depression.

To keep reading this article, click here.

Tuesday, August 15, 2017

New Thinking Needed to Handle Aging of America

The well-noted aging of the American population will continue long after the Baby Boomer generation crests, posing continuing economic challenges for the country for decades to come, a new congressionally mandated report states.

Not least of all, a consistently older population over the age of 65 will put a severe strain on federal programs such as Medicare and Social Security.

But the United States does have options that don't guarantee a grim future, according to the report by the National Research Council.These options, however, will require considerable changes in American lifestyles and in how federal programs are structured, the report, Aging and the Macroeconomy: Long-Term Implications of an Older Population, stated.

To keep reading this article, click here.

Friday, August 11, 2017

Artist Peter Max Still Hard at Work


He has painted popes, presidents, Beatles and American heroes. His color-blasted, kinetic images have been expanded to 40,000 square feet to cover the hull of a Norwegian cruise ship and shrunk to the size of a postage stamp (for an actual 1974 U.S. Postal Service 10-cent stamp). He has worked on sections of the broken Berlin Wall and at teeming Super Bowl stadiums. 
He has been praised on the covers of TimeLifeNewsweek and the New York Times Magazine, and he has been famous since the 1960s, a decade he defined perhaps better than any other visual artist of the time.
Yes, here he is, the act you've known for all these years, Peter Max — now 79 and working harder than ever, evidence of which is the beautiful Summer of Love commemorative cover wrap AARP The Magazine commissioned for its August/September 2017 issue.
To keep reaading this article, click here.

Thursday, August 10, 2017

Have You Visited Cracker Barrel? Well, This Retired Couple Has Visited 644 of Them


Do you think that if you've eaten at one Cracker Barrel restaurant, you've eaten at them all?

Then you've never met Ray and Wilma Yoder. The Indiana octogenarians actually have eaten at them all. Well, save for one. And they're getting to that last one — soon.

In a quest that has lasted 40 years and still continues, the Yoders have visited 644 of the 645 Cracker Barrel locations across the country. The only spot they've missed? The Cracker Barrel in Tualatin, Ore.

To keep reading this article, click here.

Wednesday, August 9, 2017

Airline Mechanic's Career Still Flying After 75 Years


Azriel Blackman has been an American Airlines mechanic for longer than commercial airlines have owned jets. He’s been a mechanic longer than American has been known by its current name. He’s been a mechanic so long that he worked on transatlantic planes that took off from the water. And he’s still working.

Blackman, 91, was honored earlier this month by American Airlines for his 75 years of service, and he still works at Kennedy International Airport in New York five days a week. The airline held a celebration earlier this month as Blackman broke the record for the longest career as an airline mechanic (a distinction that has been certified by Guinness World Records). The company even dedicated a Boeing 777 in his honor.

To keep reading this article, click here.

Tuesday, August 8, 2017

7 Myths About the Aging Brain Debunked

When it comes to what happens to the brain as it ages, don’t believe everything you hear. There are many myths about the ability of older people to keep their memory and concentration in tip-top shape. 
There is no evidence that brain games, for example, live up to their promise of better mental acuity. That’s one finding in a new report by the Global Council on Brain Health (GCBH), an independent collaborative of scientists, health professionals, scholars and policy experts that was convened by AARP.
Here are some of the myths the GCBH examined and why they’re wrong:
To keep reading this article, click here.

Monday, August 7, 2017

Rockin' Grandmom Is Shredding Aging Stereotypes


An 81-year-old guitar-slinging Singaporean granny has shredded stereotypes to pursue her love of rock music, becoming a sought-after performer and unlikely internet sensation.Mary Ho's late-flourishing career will reach its zenith Wednesday when she performs in front of a huge crowd at Singapore's National Day Parade, marking 52 years of the city-state's independence. Grandmother of seven Ho only started playing the guitar at 60, fulfilling a lifelong dream to learn the instrument. 
To keep reading this article, click here.

Tuesday, August 1, 2017

Grandmother Recreates Drive-In Experience for Today's Kids


Over the river and through the woods to grandmother’s drive-in we go?! Yes, there is such a thing for an Ohio family. Using her creativity and imagination, a grandmother turned her backyard into an old-fashioned drive-in movie theater for about a dozen children.
A big screen plus decorated cardboard cars with customized license plates that serve as seating were just the beginning. Sherry Pratt topped it all off with popcorn and candy.
The 49-year-old explained to ABC News that she got the idea while scrolling through Amazon. “[I] saw these movie projectors, and it hit me,” she said. "I thought, Wouldn’t it be fun to have an outdoor movie night?" 
To keep reading this article, click here.

Monday, July 31, 2017

15 Things To Know About Blood Pressure As You Age


When Raymond R. Townsend, M.D., was in medical school in the 1970s, the formula for blood pressure was simple. "Doctors were taught that the normal top blood pressure number was 100 plus a person's age," says Townsend, a professor of medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. "We now know that numbers even close to that high — as you get older — are very dangerous." 

Research has come a long way, but there's still controversy about optimal levels, the best treatments and even how to measure blood pressure. There's no debate, however, that high blood pressure can lead to heart attacks, stroke, vision problems, even dementia. 

Here are 15 must-know facts about high blood pressure that just might save your life.

To keep reading this article, click here.

Saturday, July 29, 2017

Say No to Ageism - Stephen Richards

“When we age we shed many skins: ego, arrogance, dominance, self-opinionated, unreliable, pessimism, rudeness, selfish, uncaring ... Wow, it's good to be old!” ― Stephen Richards

Friday, July 28, 2017

Positive Attitude Can Help You Live Longer

It's a well-known fact that being optimistic and focusing on emotional wellness seems to reduce stress. But did you know that a glass-half-full kind of attitude can offer even more tangible health benefits? 

Research has found, for instance, that an upbeat attitude, or happiness, can help lessen the burden of chronic pain, say from arthritis, or even reduce your chances of developing cardiovascular disease.

In fact, some experts now think that staying positive can help you live longer. In an intriguing study done at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, researchers followed a group of people for 30 years. They found that those who were originally classified as "optimistic" on a standard personality test turned out to be 20 percent less likely to suffer an early death than those classified as "pessimistic."

To keep reading this article, click here.

Thursday, July 27, 2017

Voters 50+ Show Little Support for Republican Health Care Plans


AARP conducted a survey in eight states, Alaska, Arizona, Colorado, Iowa, Louisiana, Maine, Nevada, West Virginia, among 50+ likely voters to explore attitudes towards the American Health Care Act and the policies included in this bill.
Key findings include the following:
  • There is little support for the American Health Care Act.  One-third of 50+ likely voters support this bill. In addition, a sizeable number of 50+ likely voters say they do not know whether they support or oppose this bill. 
  • There is strong opposition towards the policies included in the bill. Across political parties, majorities of likely voters age 50+ oppose policies such as charging older Americans five times more for health insurance, charging those with pre-existing conditions more, and reducing funding for Medicare and Medicaid. 
To keep reading this article, click here.

Wednesday, July 26, 2017

Willie Nelson Talks Pot, Politics, and the American Dream


In an interview with The Washington Post aboard his tour bus, Willie Nelson urged Americans to bridge what he calls a great divide in politics. The 84-year-old also asks Attorney General Jeff Sessions to open his mind on drug policy.
Nelson, a marijuana advocate and purveyor, strongly disagrees with Sessions's statement in March that marijuana dependency is "only slightly less awful" than heroin dependency.
Nelson said Sessions should "try heroin and try marijuana and then call me and let me know if he still thinks it's the same thing and one is as bad as the other."
To keep reading this article, click here.

Tuesday, July 25, 2017

Daily Does of Pot May Protect, Heal Brain, New Study Shows


Despite your average Shaggy and Scooby-style stereotypes, researchers believe that cannabis could actually help to sharpen our minds later in life.
Researchers at the University of Bonn and Hebrew University have discovered that low, regular doses of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), one of the main active ingredients or cannabinoids found in marijuana, may help to keep our brains from 'slowing down' as we get older. 
Published today in the journal Nature Medicinethe German study revealed that while younger mice suffered a performance drop under the influence of THC, the psychoactive chemical gave older mice a considerable performance boost, even putting them on par with younger mice who'd abstained.
To keep reading this article, click here.

Saturday, July 22, 2017

Say No to Ageism - Melvyn Bragg

Too old at 72? 

Careful. Ageism is out. 

We'll have the law on you!             

Wednesday, July 19, 2017

Grandparents Are Filling the Gaps in Drug-Ravaged Families


Pamela Livengood was happily embracing her status as a new grandmother when suddenly she became the primary caregiver for her daughter's 2-year-old son.
"It was quite an adjustment," said Livengood, 55, of Keene, N.H. "I wasn't ready to go back to changing diapers and getting up in the middle of the night. I thought all that was behind me. But my daughter and the baby's father got caught up in using opioids right after Francis was born. He needed me."
In Maine, about 8 percent of babies are born to women who are addicted to opioids and other drugs, according to Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine), who chairs the Senate Special Committee on Aging. The number of children raised solely by grandparents in that state rose 24 percent between 2010 and 2015. Nationwide, more than 2.6 million people are raising grandkids, according to census data. That number is rising rapidly as more parents are jailed, are forced into treatment centers or die from overdoses, according to testimony at a recent aging committee hearing.
To keep reading this article, click here.

Saturday, July 15, 2017

Say No to Ageism - Cyndi Lauper

There's ageism in everything. I don't give a hoot. It isn't what other people think; it's what you think. But it's hard to come to terms with getting older. I admire people like Vivienne Westwood. 

Saturday, July 1, 2017

A New Model for the Future of Aging

In the United States, about 10,000 people turn 65 each day, and one in five Americans will be 65 or older by 2030. Globally, the number of people age 60 and over is projected to leap from about 900 million in 2015 to 2 billion by 2050, according to the World Health Organization. 

Between 2000 and 2050, the 80-and-older cohort will almost quadruple, and those 65 and over will outnumber children under the age of 14. It should be noted that many experts see these demographic predictions as too modest. In the wake of the decoding of the human genome, even longer lives and larger aging populations may be just ahead.

We envision a future that advances public health, creates age-friendly homes and communities, enables lifelong learning, work and entrepreneurship, and promotes purposeful engagement and volunteerism.

To keep reading this article, click here.

Tuesday, June 27, 2017

Fun, Yet Frugal Activities for You and Your Grandkids


Spending time with your grandchildren can create lasting memories for all involved, but what if you can’t afford to be as generous as you’d like when treating them to a good time? 

Check out these frugal-but-fun things to do with your grandkids this summer.

To keep reading this article, click here.

Monday, June 26, 2017

5 Apps to Keep You Healthy and Independent

When you need help, every second counts. 
Being proactive about your health is important to help prevent emergencies. 
A smartphone can help keep you healthy and independent.
To keep reading this article, click here.

Live Long and Prosper: John Glenn

"Too many people, when they get old, think that they have to live by the calendar." John Glenn (1921-)
As the oldest person to board a U.S. Space Shuttle at age 77, Senator John Glenn exemplified the view that we shouldn't let age define us. The calendar is a useful way to let you know the date, but if you let yourself be hemmed in by your chronological age, you may lock yourself out of potentially valuable opportunities.

Friday, June 16, 2017

Ignore These 5 Myths About Aging


As any baby boomer will tell you, “age is just a number.” The typical member of the original Youth Generation of the ‘50s and ‘60s has no interest in following old-fashioned ideas of being old, let alone in becoming the stereotypical decrepit figure we see lampooned in cartoons and movies. The next generation of seniors is turning stereotypes of aging on their heads, by taking better care of themselves, by staying active and social—and simply not buying into the myths of aging.

To keep reading this article, click here.